Photography

Early Adopter Download of the Day: Nostalgia (Windows)

Posted on March 19, 2007. Filed under: Downloads, Photography, Pictures |

Windows only: Access your Flickr account from your desktop with Nostalgia, a gorgeous new photo-management app.

Nostalgia allows you to search Flickr remotely and create local sets from the photos you discover. It also supports local photo management and synchronizes to your Flickr account, allowing you to update your online photos as well.

And it’s a looker. Seriously, this is an app that will make Mac users jealous, with its lush interface and snazzy animations. Although still technically a prototype, Nostalgia is fully functional and a blast to use. Alas, I couldn’t get it to sync with my online account, but hopefully that’s a temporary glitch. I had no problem browsing Flickr at large and creating photo sets. Note to Yahoo: Buy this thing. Now.

Vista users can run Nostalgia straight from a browser; XP users will need to download an executable, along with Microsoft’s .NET 3.0. Nostalgia is free (for now–the developers haven’t announced their ultimate intentions for the program).

+ Nostalgia [thirteen23 via Webware]

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Create your own comic strip with Comeeko

Posted on February 18, 2007. Filed under: Animation, Comic, Photography, Pictures |

Make your own personalized comic strip with Comeeko, a fun (free!) site that lets you take your personal photos and transform them into Dilbertesque creations.

Comeeko is simple to use; just follow the wizard. You can choose your unique layout, color schemes, photos, and then you can apply various comedic elements (whap! Bam! snappo!) to your strip. What a fun way to share those pics of your kids, especially.

+ Comeeko.com

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Skeleton “Valentines” Won’t Be Parted

Posted on February 17, 2007. Filed under: Photography, Pictures, Skeleton, Valentines |

February 13, 2007—In what’s been called a Valentine’s Day gift to Italy, archaeologists today excavated two interlocked Stone Age skeletons—leaving their “eternal embrace” intact and making it easier to analyze the double burial.

Discovered last week during construction not far from Verona, the setting of Romeo and Juliet, the roughly 5,000-year-old couple has already become an icon of enduring love to many.

Like Shakespeare’s star-crossed lovers, the prehistoric twosome appear to be young, as evidenced by the condition of their teeth. But that’s about all that is known about them so far. They could just as easily be two brothers.

But dig supervisor Elena Menotti takes the romantic view.

“It was a very emotional discovery,” the archaeologist told the Associated Press last week. “From thousands of years ago we feel the strength of this love. Yes, we must call it love.”

+ via nationalgeographic.com

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Edit your images online with Picnik

Posted on February 4, 2007. Filed under: Design, Online Applications, Photography, Pictures |

Edit your images online with Picnik, a shiny new Flash-based image editor.

There’s quite a bit to Picnik, actually: you can do the basic resizes and tweaks that most other free image editors can manage; however, Picnik also comes with some nifty special effects, and can be used with a whole plethora of community photo sharing sites, i.e., Flickr, Imageshack, Photobucket, etc.

It’s not as powerful as Photoshop, naturally, but for a browser-based image editor, Picnik does a fine job.

+ Picnik.com [via .etc]

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Give your photos that ‘A Scanner Darkly’ look

Posted on February 1, 2007. Filed under: Adobe, Design, Photography |

Design ‘zine Adobe Illustrator Techniques shows you how to give your photos that cool graphic-novel look seen in the film A Scanner Darkly.

The technique combines heavy black lines with solid-color shapes, resulting in a kind of photo-realistic comic book effect. Needless to say, the process involves Illustrator, though I suspect you could use any drawing program that supports layers and painting. There’s quite a bit of work required–four to five hours, according to the author (who, incidentally, worked on the film)–but you can’t argue with the results. They’re incredible, far beyond what you can achieve with a filter alone.

+ [Adobe Illustrator Techniques via Photojojo]

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Hand Art

Posted on January 21, 2007. Filed under: Photography, Pictures |

+ more pictures

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A belated.. Merry Christmas ..

Posted on January 20, 2007. Filed under: Photography, Pictures |

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Times Square, Amazing Panoramic Photograph

Posted on January 20, 2007. Filed under: Photography, Pictures |

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How about this for tragic..

Posted on January 11, 2007. Filed under: Disturbing, Photography, Pictures |

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Download of the Day: Corel Snapfire (Windows)

Posted on November 14, 2006. Filed under: Photography |

Windows only: Edit, organize, and share your photos with Corel Snapfire, a Picasa-like photo manager that’s free, easy to use, and better than you’d expect.

The program can do all the usual stuff: cropping, slideshows, red-eye removal, and so on (though it’s pretty light on the special effects: sepia and black-and-white are the only choices). It also lets you whip together various projects, like album pages, calendars, and greeting cards. (It stomps Picasa at creating photo collages.)

I didn’t expect to like Snapfire, which seemed like little more than a limited Picasa knockoff. But it’s a pretty nice little program, especially for novice users. It’s the kind of thing I could give to my parents and not expect countless how-do-I-work-this? phone calls. Snapfire is freeware for Windows.

+ Corel Snapfire

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Learn to photograph well

Posted on November 14, 2006. Filed under: Advice, Photography |

Gadget blog Crave found some useful photography tips–both for the photographer and the photographee–in Fujifilm’s new Best Face Forward web site.

Of course, Fuji also takes the opportunity to give you the hard sell on their face-detection technology, but if you sift past the marketing hype, there are some really good tips for aspiring portrait photographers and their subjects…such as pro photographer James Ferrara’s tip to “[ask] subjects to raise or move their chins so the light hits their eyes just right.”

Of course, Fuji also takes the opportunity to give you the hard sell on their face-detection technology, but if you sift past the marketing hype, there are some really good tips for aspiring portrait photographers and their subjects…such as pro photographer James Ferrara’s tip to “[ask] subjects to raise or move their chins so the light hits their eyes just right.”

As someone who despises being photographed (just look at this mug, people–or on second thought, don’t), I found some of the tips intriguing, and I plan to try them out the next time I’m stalked by the paparazzi (we Lifehacker editors get no peace). Of course, you can find countless other photography tips in our previous posts. 

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8 Ways to Shoot Video Like a Pro

Posted on November 14, 2006. Filed under: Advice, Photography |

Nothing brings out the camcorders like the holidays, which is why this is the perfect time to admit an ugly truth: You suck at making home movies.

No, really. I’m sure you’re a nice person and all, but there’s more to videography than just taking the camcorder out of the box and pressing Record.

As with photography, good videography requires a bit of know-how. Luckily, I know how, so here’s my list of ways you can improve your home movies. You won’t come out Soderbergh on the other side, nor even Singer, but your Uncle-Henry-dropped-the-turkey-on-Aunt-Edna’s-head submission to America’s Funniest Home Videos will look a lot better.

read more »

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What the soldiers see

Posted on September 2, 2006. Filed under: News, Photography |

Here’s a great Iraq soldiers’ photo book.

       
They’re great photographs andshow in detail the horrors of today’s war.

+ photo book

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How To Eat A Zebra In 40 Minutes

Posted on September 2, 2006. Filed under: Photography |

     

+ see the whole photo book

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Rename your digital photos in bulk

Posted on August 25, 2006. Filed under: Advice, Photography |

You’ve got 342 pics from your trip to the Grand Canyon. Do you have about 3 extra hours to name them something other than 45929_23.jpg?

Me neither. Digital photography guru Derrick Story has a workaround:

First, open the folder and select View > Thumbnails.

Click the last picture in the folder you want to rename, hold down the Shift key, and click the first picture; this will select them all.

Right-click the first photo, and select Rename from the drop-down menu.

Windows XP will highlight the filename for the first photo, enabling you to give it a descriptive name.

After you type in the name, click the white space outside of the photo and watch as Windows applies the name with a sequential number to each picture in the folder.

+ Rename your digital photos automatically in Windows XP [CNet]

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Weekend Project: Make a panography

Posted on August 22, 2006. Filed under: Art, Design, Photography, Uncategorized |

Photography blog Photojojo has a simple tutorial on how to make a panography, “wide-angle pictures composed of several individual photos manually stitched together.” More from the site:

“Do you ever look up at the sky, a towering office building, or an expansive landscape and wish your photos could capture everything you can see with your eyes? We do.

Our pal Mareen does this neat thing she calls panography. Taking dozens of photos of a scene, she assembles a patchwork of images that more accurately represents what your eyes see when you’re not looking through a viewfinder.”

I love the quilt-like effect of these photos; it’s a great way to showcase your more striking outdoor images.

+ Panographies: Panoramas on Steroids

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